Makelangelo News

Makelangelo Belt Tensioner

Makelangelo is a wall hanging, mural drawing machine. There is a motor on the top left and top right of the wall, and belts hang down from there to the pen. Tension caused by gravity keeps the belt on the pulley.

To draw on the entire wall you need a belt long enough for the pen to reach the bottom corners, going diagonally across the drawing area. That means if the pen were to be in the middle and drop all the way to the bottom it would hit the floor.

Problem

When the machine tries to find home by touching limit switches, the pen holder hits the floor as described. Gravity stops, tension is lost, and the machine becomes confused.

Solution

This 3D printed tensioner fits a roller skate bearing (8x22x7) and holds the bearing against the belt, gently pinching it against the pulley. This prevents skipping and allows large machines to find home.

This has an added bonus of letting the machine accelerate faster without skipping.

Print two (one for each bearing) and then fit them onto the two corners and enjoy!

Download the part from Thingiverse here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3895310

News

Robot Arms Running Marginally Clever Open Source Code

Marginally Clever open source code is gaining traction around the world as young makers use it to build ever more amazing machines.

Pete from Fablab013 in the Netherlands says,

we used your gcodeCNCdemo to power our 3d printed robot arm.

Print time : 80+ hours
programming time : 10 minutes

Next thing you know they’ll upgrade to Evil Minion firmware so they can drive it from Robot Overlord – and we’re looking forward to it!

As we’ve said for years, affordable robot arms are the next step.  Marginally Clever wants to make that future get here quicker.  Part of that plan is we’ve been giving away the code to make it happen.  We’ve also designed our own arms, and we’re looking to help other talented robot arm designers.  We want to work with anyone else who dreams like we do.

Art

KUKA KR180 from Thingiverse, fixed

I’m slugging my way through the end of a project and I needed something to take my mind off it for a bit so I found my first vanity 3D print – a KUKA KR180 robot arm. This scale model is fully articulated. I used an M3 screw with the head cut off to hold the wrist onto the elbow without sacrificing movement. You can get all the files on thingiverse but I found I needed to fix a number of broken meshes. To save you time, here are all the files for KUKA KR180 including the fixes. A couple more M3s will hold the rest of the parts together and I used some hot glue to hold the two halves of the humerus together. I really find this model inspiring, I hope one day soon to build my own.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4575

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4575

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4575